Oct 202014
 
THE BACKWARD REVIEWER
William F. Deeck



BEVERLEY NICHOLS Horatio Green

BEVERLEY NICHOLS – The Moonflower Murder. E. P. Dutton, UK, hardcover, 1955. First published in the UK: Hutchinson, hardcover, 1955, as The Moonflower.

   In his second recorded case since his retirement as a private detective, Horatio Green is in Dartmoor in hopes of viewing the blooming of the fabulous Moonflower, transported at great expense from South America. Since he had some twenty-five years earlier investigated a jewelry theft for the owner of the Moonflower, Green had been invited to her estate to view the plant.

   The plant does bloom, forty-eight hours early, but its owner is not there to view it. Someone had strangled her and made off with her jewels.

   Since Superintendent Waller of Scotland Yard — both a friend and rival of Green’s — is in the area dealing with a recent escape from Princetown Prison, he begins an investigation of the crime with Green’s help. With the aid of his keen olfactory sense, Green identifies the culprit, while I wondered about genetics and slipshod post-mortems.

   Nichols first novel featuring Green — No Man’s Street — seemed to me to be a book by an accomplished author feeling his way into the mystery field, and thus left something to be desired. He does much better here.

— Reprinted from The MYSTERY FANcier, Vol. 11, No. 3, Summer 1989.


NOTE:   Bill’s review of Murder by Request, also by Beverley Nichols, was posted here earlier on this blog. Following that review is some biographical information about the author and a complete listing of his Horatio Green series.

 Posted by at 11:23 pm
Oct 202014
 


Harry Dean Stanton: at 88, still going strong down Route 66

A screening of an acclaimed documentary about the actor offered a rare chance to see him in concert

from The Guardian UK
Harry Dean Stanton in Hollywood, October 2014.
Harry Dean Stanton in Hollywood, October 2014. Photograph: Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images
California is crippled by a three-year “mega-drought”. The rivers are withering, the landscape a scratchy brown, and woe betide those who break the hosepipe ban.

Perfect weather, then, for a gravelly performance from Harry Dean Stanton: a man with a face like dust bowl, dessicated further by 70 odd years of cigarettes.

Stanton has appeared in more than 200 movies including Paris, Texas, Wild At Heart and as cat loving Brett in Alien. I first saw him as the dad in Pretty in Pink. Laconic, beaten-down, accepting, I thought he was the coolest thing since Molly Ringwald’s prom frock.

His backstory was explored Sophie Huber’s brilliant documentary, Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction (released in 2012, now available on Netflix).
This Swiss-born film-maker first meets her subject in his regular drinking haunt, Dan Tanas in Santa Monica, and uses music as her route in to this intensely private man. She follows him as he potters about his day-to-day routine, splicing the footage with pared down renditions of his favourite songs, such as Danny Boy and Blue Bayou, which are performed from the safety of his living room.
Late last month, the film was screened at the Grammy Museum in downtown LA, and both Stanton and Huber took part in a charming Q&A afterwards. Followed by some tunes: Stanton singing and on harmonica, accompanied by guitar and bass.
As he took to the stage, fragile as a larch, the audience moved to the edge of their seats. Stanton fumbled first for his reading glasses, then for one of his many harmonicas, all tuned to different keys. Would he make it through the first bar? He would; albeit from the comfort of an overstuffed armchair (as he said - he is 12 years off 100).
His exit was quicker: Stanton scarpered immediately after the three tracks were over; his guitarist, Jamie, revealed to the crowd that he’d called the night before to try and wriggle out of the performance.
Stanton was one of those rare beasts: exactly in the flesh as you’d suspect from the screen. Introspective, and mischievous; a loner, and old-fashioned with it. In an age of white noise and celebrity hysteria, this was a reminder of a previous time; refreshing courtesy in the drought. He’d never married, he said in the film - and only once proposed because it seemed the civil thing to do. He’s wiser now he’s older, he said. After all, “what’s wrong with silence?”

Headlines that shouldm’t be true but are

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Oct 202014
 




Daily soda consumption not only expands your waistline — it
destroys your DNA

Justice Ginsburg admits to keeping stash of ‘Notorious RBG’ shirts to give to friends

Cage-fighter War Machine blames anti-male society for his domestic violence in suicide note

Bagpipe-playing Oregon racist’s message backfires as community unites against hate

Revealed: King Tut had overbite, club foot because his parents were brother and sister

Pat Robertson rants over ‘deadly’ gay marriage in Idaho: It’s an ‘onslaught of homosexual behavior’

Texas men accidentally shoot each other while firing at partygoers over beer pong loss

SC GOP candidate: Don't be deceived -- 'cute' same-sex 'gremlins' will destroy US

Teen convicted as 'armed clowns' spread panic in French towns

John Oliver ‘dogs’ Supreme Court with hilarious canine re-enactments

Tavis Smiley rips Bill Kristol: You are ‘the worst of America’ for
using Ebola in politics

Pumpkin Festival coordinator gets physical with local reporter trying
to cover riots

Russell Brand’s anti-voting revolution makes Sex Pistols’ ‘Johnny
Rotten’ want to puke

Video shows scuffle between St. Louis Rams fans and Ferguson protesters

Oklahoma man opens fire on ex-girlfriend for not leaving 'fast enough':
police

Kafkaesque ‘bureaucratic clusterf*ck’: Oliver slams US treatment of
military translators

Fox News priest: How can we baptize kids in same-sex families if
parents are sinners?

Tennessee lawmaker arrested again, this time for stalking and
threatening neighbor

Researchers develop tiny tractor beam, and they’re sure they could make
a larger one

Welcome to the best World Series ever — and why ESPN can’t see it

Black Nevada conservative and ‘brave white man’ Cliven Bundy call Eric
Holder out

Supreme Court denies request to block Texas voter ID law

Will there be enough fish to go around? Not if we follow healthy eating
guidelines

Ebola fearmongering is the GOP’s new crazy, racist dog whistle

‘I’m not panicked, I’m just pissed’: Bill Maher blasts Dallas hospital
‘morons’ over Ebola

Two guys show up as famous women for dress as celebs event, and school
freaks out

Willie Horton 2.0: Republicans launch ‘race-baiting’ ad linking
Nebraska Democrat to murderer

Tesla Motors slams Michigan car dealers for new bill banning them from
in-state sales

Question of lynching lingers around hanging death of black NC high
school football player

California man eaten by bear after dying from heart attack







Featured in KDP Newsletter!

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Oct 202014
 

Just a quick note to say I got tons of email from folks congratulating me on being featured in the newest KDP newsletter.

Pretty cool. If you’d told me couple of years ago I’d be featured by Amazon as an example of indie success, I’d have said you were insane.

Now, you’re the smartest guy in the room.

Hopefully sales will go through the roof. My gut says probably not, but hey, can’t complain about an Amazon feature, especially when it didn’t cost anything. I mean, I could, because God knows I could complain about anything, but I won’t. For which we are all grateful.

I’ve also gotten a spate of questions asking what my secret is. To that end, here is everything I know about self-publishing and writing, collected as a few blogs that lay it all out. I have no additional info to share – this represents everything I’ve learned and done, and represents my current and past approach:

How To Sell Loads Of Books

The Three Ds

Author Myths #1

Author Myths #2

Author Myths #3

Good luck with your writing. It’s an interesting and difficult road, but one I’m glad to have traveled.

 

 

 

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Oct 202014
 
Narc #6: The Beauty Kill, by Robert Hawkes March, 1975  Signet Books The sixth volume of the Narc series is full-on blaxploitation; hell, Superfly is even namedropped on the cover. Yet again our hero, John Bolt, is lost in the colorful shuffle, Marc Olden focusing more on his vast cast of street-wise villains. Also as usual, The Beauty Kill has no pickup from previous volumes; the Narc

Best Last Scene in a Movie?

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Oct 202014
 


And there are a lot of great ones. But the other night I was reminded of one of my favorites. In the last scene in BIG NIGHT, a movie about two brothers trying to get a restaurant going, the brother who is the lesser cook but more the manager, (Stanley Tucchi) makes an omelette for his brother (Tony Shaloub) and a waiter. 

And then they sit down and eat it. This occurs after a particularly trying night for the brothers. 

There is absolutely no dialog in the scene but it perfectly encapsulates the brothers' relationship and what their life is about. 

What is your favorite last scene?
Oct 202014
 

Methinks there's dirty work afoot...

"On the Saturday morning at twelve o'clock he left England, on the wildest chase that any man had ever undertaken. And behind him, did he but know it, stalked the shadow of death."

Cue the organ music. Get the monsters and misfits ready offstage. Could that melodramatic bit of writing have originated with anyone other than the master of the early English thriller, Edgar Wallace? Of course not. It is, in fact, a key development in the rather confusing but thoroughly entertaining plot of The Door With Seven Locks, first published in 1926, and a fine example of the kind of book which made Edgar Wallace one of the most popular novelists of his day. The Door with Seven Locks is the subject of today's audio review on the Classic Mysteries podcast, and you can listen to that full review by clicking here.

The plot is difficult to sum up in a few well-chosen words. It begins with a Scotland Yard detective who is about to retire from the force. He becomes involved with a small-time crook, an expert at picking locks, who tells him about a recent lock-picking job that has made him quite nervous. Before he can pass along details, the lock-picker is murdered. Next, our retiring detective gets involved in a couple of seemingly unrelated incidents – the theft of an obscure book from a lending library (whose librarian, a young woman, will be the heroine of the story), and an assignment to go chasing around the world after a very rich and very elusive young heir who is rarely seen. That assignment leads to the departure I quoted at the beginning of this post.

In the midst of all this chasing about, we discover that there is a desperate search under way for seven individual keys which, when all used together, can open a mysterious door in a family's tomb. We meet a doctor – clearly an unsympathetic and sinister character – who is suspected of carrying out unethical medical experiments, to say the least. And we get glimpses of some powerful and dangerous creatures who may or may not be linked to the doctor. Add in our heroine’s unfortunate habit of getting herself into dangerous situations and you have a very fast-moving, easy-to-read and easy-to-enjoy – if not very easy to summarize - thriller. The Door with Seven Locks is certainly Wallace in fine form.

Wallace's popularity has endured, by the way: more than 160 movies have been made from his work, more than have been made from any other author's books. In fact, this book was made into a movie which was given a new but entirely appropriate name: Chamber of Horrors. They don't write 'em like that any more, do they?

The Challenge

As part of my continuing commitment to the Vintage Mystery Bingo Reading Challenge under way at the My Reader's Block blog, I am submitting this to cover the Bingo square calling for one book that has been made into a movie. For details about the challenge, and what I'm doing for it, please click here.

Oct 202014
 
In the debut episode of A Man Called Sloane (airing September 22, 1979), top level UNIT agent Thomas Remington Sloane (Robert Conrad) and his partner Torque (Ji-Tu Cumbuka), a giant of a man with a huge, mechanical hand, is investigating the thefts of "K3" plutonium pellets from the U.S. government.

As it turns out, the thefts have been arranged by Manfred Baranoff (the always great Roddy McDowall), a mad scientist building a private army of super-strong androids. Posing as a mercenary thief with irradiated K3 pellets to sell, Sloane attempts to infiltrate Baranoff's organization, only to have his cover immediately blown. Needless to say, agent Sloane is captured, and locked in a rather nice bedroom sealed with deadly electrical force fields. With the help of pretty Sara Nightingale (Diane Stilwell), an artist employed by Baranoff to sculpt his android's faces, Sloane escapes from his prison.

In a nice twist, Sloane discovers Baranoff's body lying on the floor of a now-empty laboratory – the scientist has been murdered by one of his own creations, a "perfect" android named Alexander (Chris Marlowe). Alexander takes command of the other 'droids, and plans an assault on a scientific laboratory, where he plans to secure enough radioactive material to power himself and his army forever.

It's a fun little bit of Seventies spy-fi fluff, with a nicely layered performance – as usual – from McDowall. There are a couple of decent fight scenes, with Conrad actually involved in the action. Unlike on The Wild Wild West, where the athletic star insisted on doing all his own stunts, on Sloane, the mercurial Conrad wasn't always as enthusiastic, and frequently let his doubles do the sweating.

The only spy gadget in this episode worth mentioning is a two-way radio hidden within a rather ostentatious money clip. And, as will frequently happen over the dozen episodes, Sloane's towering, cyborg sidekick Torque has little-to-nothing to do in this installment.

Probably because I grew up as a science fiction fan in the Seventies (i.e. "The Roger Moore 007 Years"), I find that I am very fond of the more sci-fi spy-fi; androids and death rays are so much more exotic (and fun) McGuffins than dreary old "secret documents" or mundane nuclear warheads. I love the more down-to-earth, realistic spy stories, too, but I'm not a snob.

The title of this Sloane episode is reminiscent of the episode titles on The Wild Wild West, which all began with the words "The Night of...," and specifically, the title of the first Dr. Loveless episode, "The Night The Little Wizard Shook the World." Coincidence?
Oct 202014
 

Jeff Cohen

Here's the (mostly) final update on the MISSING HEAD CHALLENGE: Thanks to all who posted pictures of themselves with the first Asperger's Mystery from E.J. Copperman/Jeff Cohen! We all greatly appreciate your effort and hope that you enjoy the book! Donations are being made to the Autism Spectrum Education Network (ASPEN). While the Challenge is officially over, we'll keep donating for those who continue to post pictures!

And on to business.

Just for the record: My son is actually nothing like Samuel Hoenig. Seriously.

I understand why I get the question. If I were in the position of those who ask it, I would probably do the same. It's not at all too large a leap to attempt. But the honest fact is, there is very little connection.

Samuel is the "hero" (he would not ever consider himself such) of Question of Missing HeadTHE QUESTION OF THE MISSING HEAD, the aforementioned Asperger's mystery. He is 29 years old in that book (sorry, Josh Getzler--in my mind Samuel's in his 30s because I'm already past Book #2), lives at home with his mother, prefers working by himself, has a driver's license but doesn't drive, and is formal in his language and meticulous in his observation.

He has Asperger's Syndrome, which until recently was a disorder and is now a nebulous part of the autism spectrum, but that's a whole other story. (Grammar fans: I do in fact know there is no such word as "nother.")

My son Josh (not Getzler) is 25 years old, lives at home with both his parents, prefers working by himself, drives pretty much every day, and is not at all formal in his language nor especially meticulous in his observation.

But he does have Asperger's, and that's why people ask.

I've written about Josh before. In fact, I wrote two non-fiction books about raising him (and other people raising their children with AS) long before Samuel ever came to life on the page. I've occasionally posted about him here, and if there's anybody out there who's looking for an employee doing... just about anything, he's still mostly available. Don't hesitate.

In the Aaron Tucker series, back when I was a feckless youth of 43, I included Aaron's son Ethan who--waddaya know!--had Asperger's. That was mostly because nobody knew what it was in 2002 and I figured I could reach some and educate them while writing what I hoped was a funny mystery. And sure enough, the 38 people who read those books often get in touch to let me know they learned something, which makes me proud.

So because I have mentioned Josh's Asperger's in public, and now I write an adult character who has AS, people naturally assume he's the inspiration for the character. And I suppose he is, in that I wouldn't have known much about Asperger's or autism or a number of other things if I had not been Josh's dad. But the similarity ends there.

My Josh is a graduate of the Drexel University film and video program and has made a few short films. He lives at home because he managed to get out of college and enter the absolute worst economy since Tom Joad graduated from Hard Knox. He'd love to be making enough to rent his own apartment. Sure, he likes his parents, but maybe living on his own wouldn't be so awful.

Samuel lives at home because he likes it, enjoys his mother's company, and if he were being completely honest, the thought of being in his own place probably scares him a little bit.

Josh is working part-time at a movie theater and wants to make, or assist in the making of, film or television. Samuel owns a business called Questions Answered, which he operates out of a former pizzeria.

Samuel's Asperger's makes it difficult for him to process idioms and understand body language. Josh might have had those challenges when he was 10, but he's learned enough that it doesn't really seem to slow him down much anymore.

Samuel asks everybody what Beatles song is his/her favorite. Josh likes to talk about comic books, superhero movies, and Doctor Who. It's not at all unusual for a person with AS to have an intense interest in one subject.

The things Samuel does in THE QUESTION OF THE MISSING HEAD, including investigating the theft of a frozen specimen from a cryonics lab and the murder of a scientist, are things Josh wouldn't ever do. And if a loud alarm were to sound, while Samuel is almost incapacitated, Josh would be uncomfortable and probably annoyed.

Samuel would probably never make a film in which a baby devours his babysitter (off-screen) for fun. That's all I'm saying.

So if you want to know whether I wrote Samuel because I've grown up with Josh, sure. There is much to learn from people with any type of autism spectrum disorder. I've become a better person through knowing my son. It helps write with compassion when necessary.

If you believe that  Samuel is based on Josh? No. They're really very different. 

But thanks for asking.

 

P.S. Pitchers and catchers report in 116 days.