Aug 092014
 

TriplettThere’s still time to get in on the action. The dealers’ room will be open today from 9 AM to 4:45 PM and from 9 AM to 2 PM on Sunday.

Our Saturday afternoon programming will start at 1 PM when Ron Fortier will moderate a New Pulp Fiction Panel on “The Fun of Writing Pulp Fiction.” It will be followed by two more New Fictioneers readings.

Saturday evening’s events will include the PulpFest 2014 Business Meeting beginning at 7:30 PM. It will be followed by the 2014 Munsey Award Presentation at 7:50 PM. Our presentations for the evening will include Unknown: The Best in Fantasy FictionThe Mystery and Mastery of John Newton Howitt, and the last four chapters of Buck Rogers following our Saturday Night at the Auction.

Tonight’s auction will include over 150 pulps as well as digests and dime novels as well as a selection of books, fanzines, manuscripts, and ephemera from the collection of Everil Worrell, author of nineteen stories for Weird Tales. Four lots of material from the collection of pulp author Paul S. Powers will also be sold. There will also be approximately eighty more lots submitted for sale by convention members.

You can learn more about all of our great presentations by visiting the Programming page of our website.

Don’t let PulpFest 2014 slip by. Come to Columbus and join in on the fun! Admission to the show is $15 on Saturday and $5 on Sunday, allowing entry to all convention activities. Children under 15 accompanied by a parent are free. The general public is welcome to attend.

To learn more about the image used in this post, click on the illustration.

Aug 082014
 

Terror Tales 34-09PulpFest 2014 got underway on Thursday evening with early-bird shopping starting at 6 PM and a full slate of programming starting at 8 PM. Now, in just two hours, the PulpFest 2014 dealers’ room will be open to all. Upon entry to the Hyatt’s spacious exhibition hall, collectors will be greeted by more than 100 tables filled with pulps, books, original artwork, vintage comics, and other collectibles. And the feeding frenzy will begin!

There’s still plenty of time to join in on the fun. Members will be able to register today for the convention, beginning at 9 PM, and at any time during regular dealers’ room hours. To help things move smoothly, please bring along a completed registration form. You can download a copy by clicking here.

Our dealers’ room will open to all at 10 AM and remain open until 5 PM. Our afternoon programming will start at 1:30 PM with the first of three New Fictioneers readings. Our evening programming will begin at 7:30 PM as PulpFest chairman Jack Cullers offers an official welcome to all attendees.

Friday night’s programming will feature a brief look at 1939: Science Fiction’s Boom YearStartling Stories: An OverviewA Feast of Farmer: PJF’s Early Science FictionPulp Promos, Part TwoEighty Years of TerrorScience Fiction’s “Golden Age” , and chapters 5 – 8 of Buck Rogers.

We’ll have more exciting programming for you on Saturday, including an auction of more than 100 lots of collectibles. You can learn more about all of our great presentations by visiting the Programming page of our website.

Admission to the show is $15 per day or $35 for all three days, allowing entry to all convention activities. Children under 15 accompanied by a parent are free. The general public is welcome to attend.

To learn more about the image used in this post, click on the illustration.

Aug 072014
 

FFM-40-08

PulpFest 2014 will begin today at 4 PM, as our dealers begin to erect their displays for “Summer’s Great Pulp Con!” All members will be able to register for the convention from 5 to 9 PM, right outside our dealers’ room. There will be early-bird shopping in the dealers’ room from 6 to 10 PM for loyal attendees who help to defray the convention’s costs by staying three nights at our host hotel. The cost is $30 for those who stay elsewhere.

Early registration for the general membership will take place on Thursday, beginning at 5 PM right outside of the dealers’ room located in the Regency Ballroom on the hotel’s third floor. All members, dealers included, can pick up their registration packets at this time. To help things move smoothly, please bring along a completed registration form. You can download a copy by clicking here.

For those of you who have not yet registered forPulpFest, Thursday evening will be an ideal time to do so. Three-day memberships will be available for $35. Single day memberships costing $15 per day will also be available. The early-bird shopping option cost an additional $30. It’s free to those members who will be staying at the Hyatt. Please visit our Registration page for further details. Members will also be able to register for the convention on Friday morning, beginning at 9 PM, and at any time during regular dealers’ room hours. Your membership allows entry to all convention activities. Children, accompanied by a parent, who are fifteen and younger will be admitted free of charge. So bring your family! The general public is very much welcome to attend.

As a prelude to the start of Thursday’s convention, Ohio State University’s Thompson Library will be hosting a lecture by author and pulp fan Laurie Powers. She will be speaking about her grandfather, the noted pulp writer Paul Powers. All PulpFest 2014 attendees are welcome to attend Laurie’s lecture on Thursday, beginning at 4:30 PM. It will be held in Room 150 A/B. The library is located at 1858 Neil Avenue, about two and one-half miles from the Hyatt Regency Columbus.

Our full programming slate for the evening will begin at 8 PM with a tribute to the late Frank Robinson, winner of the Lamont Award in the year 2000. There will also be presentations on Frank Munsey’s Famous Fantastic Mysteriespulp artist Harold Winfield ScottThe Avenger’s Diamond Jubileeand our annual FamerCon panel, The Farmerian VisionClosing out the night will be the first four chapters of the 1939 science-fiction movie serial, Buck Rogers.

You can find additional details about these and all of our presentations by visiting the Programming page of our website.

To learn more about the image used in this post, click on the illustration.

Aug 052014
 

FlyerPulpFest 2014 will begin on Thursday, August 7th, at 4 PM, as our dealers begin to erect their displays for “Summer’s Great Pulp Con!” All members will be able to register for the convention from 5 to 9 PM, right outside our dealers’ room. There will be early-bird shopping in the dealers’ room from 6 to 10 PM for loyal attendees who help to defray the convention’s costs by staying three nights at our host hotel. The cost is $30 for those who stay elsewhere. Our full programming slate for the evening will begin at 8 PM with a tribute to the late Frank Robinson, winner of the Lamont Award in the year 2000. There will also be presentations on Frank Munsey’s Famous Fantastic Mysteries, pulp artist Harold Winfield ScottThe Avenger’s Diamond Jubileeand our annual FamerCon panel, The Farmerian VisionClosing out the night will be the first four chapters of the 1939 science-fiction movie serial, Buck Rogers.

 As a prelude to the start of Thursday’s convention, Ohio State University’s Thompson Library will be hosting a lecture by author and pulp fan Laurie Powers. She will be speaking about her grandfather, the noted pulp writer Paul Powers. All PulpFest 2014 attendees are welcome to attend Laurie’s lecture on Thursday, beginning at 4:30 PM. It will be held in Room 150 A/B. The library is located at 1858 Neil Avenue, about two and one-half miles from the Hyatt Regency Columbus.

Early registration for the general membership will take place on Thursday, beginning at 5 PM right outside of the dealers’ room located in the Regency Ballroom on the hotel’s third floor. All members, dealers included, can pick up their registration packets at this time. To help things move smoothly, please bring along a completed registration form. You can download a copy by clicking hereAlthough we’d love to have you fill out the survey portion of our registration form, it is optional.

For those of you who have not yet registered forPulpFest, Thursday evening will be an ideal time to do so. Three-day memberships will be available for $35. Single day memberships costing $15 per day will also be available. Children, accompanied by a parent, who are fifteen and younger will be admitted free of charge. Please visit our Registration page for further details. Members will also be able to register for the convention on Friday morning, beginning at 9 PM, and at any time during regular dealers’ room hours.

Please note that advance registrations are no longer available. Our Paypal page was shut down around 10 PM on Monday night.

From 9 to 10 AM on Friday, August 8th, the dealers’ room will be open only to dealers for set-up. It will open to all at 10 AM and remain open until 5 PM. Our afternoon programming will start at 1:30 PM with the first of three New Fictioneers readings. Our evening programming will begin at 7:30 PM as PulpFest chairman Jack Cullers offers an official welcome to all attendees. Friday night’s programming will feature a brief look at 1939: Science Fiction’s Boom YearStartling Stories: An OverviewA Feast of Farmer: PJF’s Early Science FictionPulp Promos, Part TwoEighty Years of TerrorScience Fiction’s “Golden Age” , and chapters 5 – 8 of Buck Rogers.

Buck Rogers Film Poster

On Saturday, August 9th, the PulpFest dealers’ room will be open from 9 AM to 4:45 PM. It will be closing fifteen minutes early to allow time for people to prepare for our Saturday Night Dinner at Buca di Beppo, a get-together arranged by registration and volunteer coordinator Sally Cullers. Please note that this event has sold out.

Our Saturday afternoon programming will start at 1 PM when Ron Fortier will moderate a New Pulp Fiction Panel on “The Fun of Writing Pulp Fiction.” It will be followed by two more New Fictioneers readings. Saturday evening’s events will include the PulpFest 2014 Business Meeting beginning at 7:30 PM. It will be followed by the 2014 Munsey Award Presentation at 7:50 PM. Our presentations for the evening will include Unknown: The Best in Fantasy FictionThe Mystery and Mastery of John Newton Howitt, and the last four chapters of Buck Rogers following our Saturday Night at the AuctionOur auction will include over 150 pulps as well as digests and dime novels as well as a selection of books, fanzines, manuscripts, and ephemera from the collection of Everil Worrell, author of nineteen stories for Weird Tales. Four lots of material from the collection of pulp author Paul S. Powers will also be sold.

On Sunday, August 10th, the dealers’ room will be open to all members from 9 AM to 2 PM as our dealers pack up. If you are coming just for the day, please be aware that buying and selling opportunities may be limited.

For additional details on all of our afternoon and evening programming events, please visit our Programming page for further details. Each entry is linked to a post that provides further information on that event. Just click on the event’s title.

Early indications are that we will surpass last year’s show both in our number of registrations and rooms booked at the hotel. We are hoping that this year’s con will be our biggest and best yet. For some time, we’ve been receiving registrations every day, many from people who have never attended PulpFest before. If you’ve been thinking about attending, but have yet to pull the trigger, you probably should call the hotel and make your reservation immediately. You can do so by calling 1-888-421-1442 or 1-614-463-1234. Please be sure to mention PulpFest when placing your reservation.

The Hyatt Regency is located at 350 North High Street in downtown Columbus, Ohio. The hotel is south of I-670, just 15-20 minutes from Columbus International Airport. In the heart of the active Arena District, the Hyatt Regency is just a few minutes’ walk from the trendy Short North Arts District. There are shops and restaurants galore right outside the hotel’s entrance. Click here for directions.

For those who will be staying at the Hyatt Regency during the convention, parking is free at the Chestnut Street Garage, one block south of the hotel. The garage is connected to the hotel via an enclosed and covered walkway. For those visiting PulpFest for the day, you can also use the Chestnut Street Garage. Rates vary based on time, but $16 will get you a day’s parking with in and out privileges. Additional parking is available at the Convention Center underground garage or the Center’s east lot. Again, rates are time-based and $14 will get you parking for 12 hours with no in and out privileges. Click here for a more detailed look at parking near the Hyatt Regency. Alternately, if you don’t mind walking a few blocks, there are many inexpensive options. Click here for an interactive parking map of Columbus and search near 350 North High Street.

From 4 PM to 11 PM on Thursday, the dealers’ room will be open for exhibitors to set up their displays. At this point, we urge all of our dealers to take full advantage of our generous load-in and set-up period. While unloading and transporting your goods should be very easy–there’s a back entrance to the hotel for loading and we have been granted exclusive use of a freight elevator–there is bound to be a certain amount of disorientation as folks negotiate their way around the Hyatt. Remember that we’ll also be offering early-bird shopping in the dealers’ room from 6 to 10 PM on Thursday evening, an extra four hours of selling opportunities to people who are ready to buy!

All PulpFest attendees will be able to submit material for inclusion in the Saturday Night Auction. For additional information, please visit our Auctions page under “Programming” or contact Barry Traylor via email at barry@pulpfest.com. In addition to 104 auction lots submitted by Joseph Saine and the Worrell and Powers estates, we will be accepting about eighty additional lots from registered members of PulpFest 2014. However, due to the substantial amount of material already submitted, there may be limits on the number of lots that can be offered by each consignee. The sooner you submit your consignment to Mike Chomko, the more likely that it will be included in our auction. Mike’s tables will be along the wall, across from the registration desk just inside the entrance to the PulpFest dealers’ room. All lots submitted must have a minimum value of $20. All lots that do not receive a bid of $20 or more will be passed. If you plan to offer an auction lot with a reserve price, your reserve must be $50 or more. No lots with a reserve price of less than $50 will be accepted. PulpFest reserves the right to reject any auction material that is unlikely to meet our minimum bid or reserve price standards as well as our content standards. The convention charges sellers 10% of the selling price for anything sold in the auction.

For those attendees who would like to ship their purchases to their homes, PulpFest 2014 has arranged for a local UPS provider to be available at the hotel on Sunday, August 10th. He will be arriving between 11 AM and noon and will stay as long as his services are needed. Further information is available on our FAQ  page.

The entire PulpFest 2014 organizing committee–Mike Chomko, Jack and Sally Cullers, Ed Hulse, Barry Traylor, and Chuck Welch–is looking forward to seeing you all in just a few days. Have a safe trip to Columbus.

Aug 022014
 

WWW 34-01-27PulpFest is very pleased to announce that Lisa Scott, the granddaughter of pulp artist Harold Winfield Scott, will be attending our 2014 convention. We’ve asked pulp art historian David Saunders to create a short presentation on Lisa’s grandfather to welcome Ms. Scott to “Summer’s Great Pulp Con!”

Join PulpFest on Thursday evening, August 7th at 9:15, for a brief profile on the life and work of H. W. Scott. Afterward, Lisa will join David Saunders onstage for a short question-and-answer session.

Harold Winfield Scott studied art with Dean Cornwell at the Pratt Institute. By 1930, he was regularly selling freelance cover paintings to such pulps as Danger Trail, Top-Notch, Complete Stories, Wild West Weekly, Star Sports, The Avenger, Doc Savage, Two-Gun Western, Quick-Trigger Western, and others. He later sold freelance work to slick magazines, such as Liberty, Colliers and Red Book. In the 1950s, his work appeared on paperback books from Dell as well as comic books.

To learn more about the image used in this post, click on the illustration.

Jul 312014
 

FlyerPulpFest 2014 will start on Thursday, August 7th. The dealers’ room will be open to registered sellers to set up their displays from 4 to 11 PM. Ohio State’s Thompson Library will also offer a free lecture at 4:30 PM. Early registration for all convention attendees will take place outside the dealers’ room from 5 to 9 PM. There will be early-bird shopping available to PulpFest members who will be staying at the Hyatt Regency Columbus from 6 to 10 PM. Our full slate of programming will get underway at 8 PM.

Thursday, August 7th

4:00 PM – 11:00 PM – Dealer Set-Up – the dealers’ room will be open to dealers to assemble their displays.

4:30 PM – Ohio State Lecture Series – author and pulp fan Laurie Powers will be speaking about her grandfather, the noted pulp writer Paul Powers, at Ohio State’sThompson LibraryPulpFest members are invited to attend this annual lecture sponsored by Ohio State University.

5:00 PM – 9:00 PM – Early Registration – general members and dealers will be able to register for PulpFest.

6:00 PM – 10:00 PM - Early-Bird Shopping – the dealers’ room will be open to loyal attendees who help to defray the convention’s costs by staying three nights at our host hotel. The cost is $30 for those who stay elsewhere.

Evening Programming

8:00 PM – Remembering Frank Robinson – winner of the 2000 Lamont Award,Frank Robinson was the author of The Power, Pulp Culture, Science Fiction of the 20th Century, and other worksYears before setting pen to paper, Frank was collecting pulp magazines. PulpFest pays tribute to the author, collector, and friend who passed away on June 30th of this year.

8:30 PM – Frank Munsey’s Famous Fantastic Mysteries – Blood ‘n’ Thunder editorEd Hulse and author Nathan Madison discuss this reprint magazine, one of the major science-fiction titles started in 1939. It introduced new readers to the classic “scientific romances” that originally appeared in the premier Munsey magazinesThe Argosy and All-Story Weekly.

9:15 PM - The Avenger’s Diamond Jubilee – in 1939, Richard Henry Benson, the chalk-faced crime fighter who founded “Justice, Incorporated,” was the last of Street & Smith’s major pulp heroes to get his own magazine. Pop-culture scholar Rick Lai offers a behind-the-scenes history of the character’s creation and development.

10:00 PM – The Farmerian Vision – moderator Paul Spiteri and panelists Jason Aiken and Christopher Paul Carey will discuss the unique way in which the Hugo award-winning author blended pulp elements and themes with his science-fictional works..

11:00 PM - Buck Rogers – Chapters 1 – 4 of this science fiction classic from 1939, this Universal serial starred Larry “Buster” Crabbe as the time-traveling hero introduced in Philip Nowlan’s 1928 pulp novella “Armageddon 2419 A.D.”

Friday, August 8th

9:00 AM – 10 AM - Early Registration – all members will be able to register for PulpFest. The dealers’ room will be open only to dealers for set-up.

10:00 AM – 5 PM – Wheeling and Dealing – the dealers’ room will be open to all.

1:30 PM – The New Fictioneers – Dick Enos, author of the popular Rick Steele adventure books, will read from four of his novels as well as his not-yet-released Rick Steele adventure, The Monster of Chinatown.

2:30 PM - The New Fictioneers – Christopher Paul Carey, the coauthor with Philip José Farmer of Gods of Opar: Tales of Lost Khokarsa, and the author of Exiles of Kho, will read from the Farmer-inspired “The Goddess Equation.”

3:30 PM – The New Fictioneers – Ralph L. Angelo, Jr., winner of the 2014 New Pulp Award for Best New Author, will read from his Crystalon series and The Cagliostro Chronicles.

Evening Programming

7:30 PM – Welcome to PulpFest – Chairman Jack Cullers offers an official welcome to all attendees

7:40 PM - 1939: Science Fiction’s Boom Year – a brief overview of the “big bang” that launched six science-fiction pulps and ushered in the genre’s Golden Age.

8:00 PM - Startling Stories: An Overview – designed as a companion to Thrilling Wonder Stories, this pulp outlasted most of its competitors and became one of the most respected science-fiction pulps in the field. PulpFest‘s Ed Hulse presents a slideshow of Startling’s 99 covers and touches on the many famous yarns published in its pages.

8:30 PM - A Feast of Farmer: PJF’s Early Science Fiction – Meteor Housepublisher Mike Croteau and Book Cave co-host Art Sippo review Philip José Farmer’s pulp and digest stories, including “The Lovers,” a classic tale from Startling Stories that pioneered the intelligent use of sex in science fiction.

9:00 PM - Pulp Promos, Part Two – in a sequel to his extremely well-received presentation of last year, Chris Kalb takes another look at the now-rare premiums that pulp fans of yore could obtain for a dime and a coupon.

9:30 PM - Eighty Years of Terror - weird-menace fiction was less than a year old when its most successful and long-lasting exponent, Terror Tales, first appeared on the nation’s newsstands in the summer of 1934. A blue-ribbon panel of fans and collectors weighs in on this Popular Publications title, as well as other shudder pulps.

10:30 PM - Science Fiction’s “Golden Age” - under the editorship of John W. Campbell, Street & Smith’s Astounding Science Fiction was the genre’s trend setter, introducing many of the field’s top authors and publishing some of its most memorable stories. This presentation reviews Astounding’s 1939 issues, which featured the early fiction of Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, Theodore Sturgeon, and A. E. van Vogt.

11:00 PM - Buck Rogers - Chapters 5 – 8 follows Buck and his pal Buddy Wade in their battle against the ruthless dictator, Killer Kane, and his army of super-racketeers.

Saturday, August 9th

9:00 AM – 4:45 PM – Wheeling and Dealing – the dealers’ room will be open to all.

1:00 PM - New Pulp Fiction Panel – moderator Ron Fortier is joined by writers Ralph Angelo, Jim Beard, Wayne Reinagel, Frank Schildiner, and Art Sippo as they discuss “The Fun of Writing Pulp Fiction.”

2:00 PM - The New Fictioneers – Jim Beard, author of the Captain Action novels and creator of Sgt. Janus, Spirit Breakerwill read from Sgt. Janus Returns,Monster Earth, and Pride of the Mohicans.

3:00 PM - The New Fictioneers – Frank Schildiner, who has written for Black Coat PressPulp Obscura, and others, will read from his forthcoming Thunder Jim Wade novella and a story from the Tales of the Shadowmen series.

5:00 PM – 7 PM - Saturday Night Dinner – join your fellow fans of pulp fiction for a delightful meal at Buca di Beppo in this get-together arranged by registration and volunteer coordinator Sally Cullers. (Note: Sorry, but this has sold out!)

Evening Programming

7:30 PM – PulpFest 2014 Business Meeting – all members are invited to ask questions and offer suggestions at this session.

7:50 PM – 2014 Munsey Award Presentation – Pop Culture Professor and unabashed pulp fan Garyn G. Roberts will present this year’s Munsey Award to a select individual.

8:00 PM - Unknown: The Best in Fantasy Fiction  – celebrate the 75th birthday of Street & Smith’s Unknown, the home to many of the pulp era’s most memorable—and oft-anthologized—fantasy and horror stories. We revisit the magazine’s highlights, including Edd Cartier’s magnificent artwork, in our tribute.

8:30 PM - The Mystery and Mastery of John Newton Howitt –art historian David Saunders chronicles the life and career of this prolific pulp artist, paying special attention to his memorable covers for the Popular Publications weird-menace magazines Terror Tales and Horror Stories.

9:30 PM – Saturday Night at the Auction – auctioneers John Gunnison and Joseph Saine are back to sell rare collectibles consigned by PulpFest dealers and attendees.

11:30 PM – Buck Rogers - Chapters 9 – 12 bring the 1939 Universal serial directed by Ford Beebe and Saul A. Goodkind to an exciting and satisfying close.

Sunday, August 10th

Daytime Schedule

9:00 AM – 2 PM – Wheeling and Dealing – the dealers’ room will be open to all as our dealers pack up. Buying and selling opportunities may be limited.

For questions and/or suggestions about our programming, please write to programming director Ed Hulse at ed@pulpfest.com.

Jul 302014
 

Terror Tales 34-11John Newton Howitt studied at the Art Students League with George Bridgman and Walter Clark. A devoted landscape painter, his work was sold at fine art galleries in New York City. In 1905 he began to freelance for The New York Herald Tribune, This Week, and other publications. His later markets included Red Book, Woman’s Home Companion, Maclean’s, and Scribner’s. Following the First World War, Howitt’s work could be found in Country Gentleman, Farm Life, Liberty, and The Saturday Evening Post.

The Great Depression vastly diminished the markets to which Howitt had been selling. Needing an income, he turned to the pulps. An excellent painter, Howitt found a ready market in the rough-paper periodicals, selling freelance pulp covers to Adventure, Dime Detective, Dime Mystery, Horror Stories, Love StorySecret Service Operator #5, The Spider, Terror Tales, Top-Notch, The Whisperer, and Western Story. Although he signed his covers for the western, adventure, and romance pulps with his professional signature, his work for the hero and weird-menace pulps was signed with only his initial, “H.”

Although John Newton Howitt’s iconic cover images for Terror Tales, Horror Stories, The Spider, and Operator #5 are among the most disturbing in the history of pulp art, his painting technique is among the most dignified of all the pulp artists. On Saturday, August 9th, at 8:30 PM, please join art historian David Saunders for an exploration of “The Mystery and Mastery of John Newton Howitt” at PulpFest 2014.

Born in 1954, David Saunders is a New York artist. His work has been exhibited worldwide in museums and corporate and private collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Brooklyn Museum of Art, and the Hirschhorn Museum of Art in Washington, DC. He has taught art at colleges nationwide, including Yale, Oberlin, R.I.S.D., S.C.A.D., Middlebury, Washington University, as well as art schools in France, Korea, Mexico and Japan.

David’s father was the legendary illustrator, Norman Saunders. His mother, Ellene Politis Saunders, worked at Fawcett Publications as Chief Executive Editor of Woman’s Day Magazine. In 1972, David became his father’s business and correspondence secretary, which started a long project to catalog his father’s 7,000 published illustrations. He spent the next seventeen years gathering published examples of his father’s work from used bookshops and submitting each new entry to his father’s inspection. What began as a sentimental hobby for a father and son grew into an impressive archive of 20th century American illustration. After his father’s death in 1989, he continued to complete the archive on his own. He interviewed his father’s surviving associates to record their oral histories. These transcripts helped to broaden his viewpoint of the popular culture publishing industry and also recorded vital information about the lives of other historic illustrators. Some of this material has been published as biographical profiles of classic illustrators in Illustration Magazine and a number of book-length biographies and appreciations of pulp artists.

David Saunders is the foremost scholar of American pulp illustrators. His free public website, Field Guide to Wild American Pulp Artists, has over three-hundred biographical profiles of these creators of popular culture. David continues to research, document, and promote a greater appreciation of pulp artists. To find out more, please visit pulpartists.comdavidsaunders.biznormansaunders.com, and the illustratedpress.com.

To learn more about the image used in this post, click on the illustration.

Jul 292014
 

Unknown 39-03On Saturday, August 9th, at 8 PM, celebrate the 75th anniversary of the publication considered the best fantasy magazine of all time, Street & Smith’s Unknown. Join acclaimed lecturer on the history of pulp magazinesProfessor Tom Krabacher of California State University, Sacramento; commentator Walker Martin, who writes about pulp collecting on Pulpmags and Mystery*File; and Professor Garyn G. Roberts, editor of The Prentice Hall Anthology of Science Fiction and Fantasy, as they revisit the magazine’s highlights.

Debuting in February 1939 and publishing a complete novel in each issue, Unknown featured many works now considered classics of the fantasy genre—Anthony Boucher’s “The Compleat Werewolf,” L. Sprague DeCamp’s “Lest Darkness Fall,” L. Ron Hubbard’s “Fear” and “Typewriter in the Sky,” Fritz Leiber’s “Conjure Wife” and the early Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser stories, Norvell W. Page’s Prester John stories “Flame Wind” and “Sons of the Bear-God,” Theodore Sturgeon’s “It,” Jack Williamson’s “Darker Than You Think,” and many others.

Over its 39-issue run, the magazine went through a variety of permutations including the elimination of cover art beginning with the July 1940 number. The magazine would get a new name in  late 1941. Despite the changes, Unknown Worlds would be cancelled following the issue dated October 1943.

Krabacher’s, Martin’s, and Robert’s presentation, “Unknown: The Best in Fantasy Fiction,” accompanied by selected cover art, is yet another reason to make PulpFest your “must-see” convention of 2014!

To learn more about the image used in this post, click on the illustration.

Jul 282014
 

Terror Tales 34-09Back in the days of bread lines and hobo jungles, millions of readers found escapist thrills in the pages of cheaply produced magazines printed on rough pulpwood paper. Pulp magazines catered to every imaginable reading taste from detective yarns to pirate stories, from jungle adventures to science fiction, from sports stories to romance tales. But the wildest of them all were the notorious horror tomes known collectively as the shudder pulps.

The so-called “shudder” or “weird-menace” titles were a blood-red splash of color in the grey days of the Great Depression. They announced their monthly wares with circus-poster-style covers featuring voluptuous under-dressed beauties being pursued by hordes of leering lunatics as bent as boomerangs. Their promise: cheap thrills, and plenty of them. In their nightmare universe it was always a dark and stormy night. Tethered damsels suffered in the clutches of fiends such as hell-mad surgeons, warped scientists, and masked and cowled cultists, eagerly abetted by legions of demented dwarfs and horny hunchbacks. They stripped, whipped, and boiled their curvaceous victims with the enthusiasm of medieval inquisitors. Even the requisite rock-jawed heroes of these stories suffered a purgatory of horrors in order to rescue their brutally treated fair maidens.

The weird-menace magazines lasted for but a few brief years, roughly from 1933 to 1941, when the actions of blue-nosed watchdogs helped propel them from the market. In contrast to previous horror magazines with their literate but fusty eldritch mysteries, the new breed of terror pulps dared go where no newsstand magazines had gone before. Dime Mystery 33-10Join PulpFest 2014 on Friday, August 8th, at 9:30 PM as we celebrate the eightieth anniversary of Terror Tales, the best of the weird-menace magazines.

Popular culture professor Garyn G. Roberts, winner of the 2013 Munsey Award and editor of some of the best collections from the pulps; Ed Hulse, publisher of Murania Press books and a consultant for the Dime Detective series from Altus Press; and Walker Martin, who writes about pulp collecting for Steve Lewis’ Mystery*File blog, will weigh in on this Popular Publications title, as well as other shudder pulps–Ace Mystery, Dime MysteryEerie Mysteries, Eerie Stories, Horror StoriesMystery Novels and Short Stories, Mystery Tales, Spicy Mystery Stories, Thrilling Mystery, Uncanny Tales, and others.

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Jul 282014
 

Astounding Science-Fiction 39-02When John W. Campbell became editor of Astounding Stories, he began working to create a science-fiction magazine for mature readers. Writers, both new and old, began to respond: Lester Del Rey with “The Faithful” and “Helen O’Loy;” Jack Williamson with “The Legion of Time;” and L. Ron Hubbard with “The Tramp.” Campbell himself joined in with “Who Goes There,” as did Clifford D. Simak, who had left science fiction, and new writers L. Sprague de Camp and Eric Frank Russell. Seasoned professionals such as Arthur J. Burks, Raymond Z. Gallun, and Manly Wade Wellman also joined in.

But Campbell had been merely tilling the soil in the first year of his editorship, preparing it for the blossoming of science fiction’s Golden Age in 1939. The stage was set when the February Astounding Science-Fiction featured the magazine’s first cover by Hubert Rogers. A free-lance illustrator long associated with Adventure, Rogers would paint nearly sixty covers for Campbell’s Astounding.

Astounding Science Fiction 39-07Although the outpouring of exceptional fiction continued in the early months of 1939, it is the July issue that is most often cited as the start of Astounding‘s golden age. Behind an effective cover by artist Graves Gladney, the reader would find the first prose fiction by A. E. van Vogt as well as Isaac Asimov’s first story for the magazine. August’s and September’s issues continued the trend with the first stories of Robert A. Heinlein and Theodore Sturgeon. October’s number began the serialization of E. E. Smith’s “Gray Lensman,” along with another tale by Heinlein.

Under the editorship of John W. Campbell, Street & Smith’s Astounding Science Fiction was the genre’s trend setter, introducing many of the field’s top authors and publishing some of its most memorable stories. On Friday, August 8th, beginning at 10:30 PM, please join 2013 Munsey Award winner, Professor Garyn G. Roberts, editor of The Prentice Hall Anthology of Science Fiction and Fantasy; Professor Tom Krabacher of California State University, Sacramento, a member of the Pulp Era Amateur Press Society who has written and lectured on the history of pulp magazines and has long owned a lengthy run of Astounding, back to the late thirties; and PulpFest organizer, movie and pulp historian, author, and the editor of Blood ‘n Thunder, Ed Hulse who will dissect Astounding’s 1939 issues and the blossoming of science fiction’s Golden AgeA slide show featuring the 1939 issues of Street & Smith’s Astounding Science Fiction will accompany the trio’s presentation.

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