Ed Gorman

From Sandra Balzo Jerry Healy and dogs

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Oct 212014
 


By Sandra Balzo

http://jeremiahhealy.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Sandy-and-Jerry-150x111.jpg   As many of you know, Jeremiah Healy died on August 14, 2014, at the age of 66 after a long battle with depression.

Jerry and I are both mystery writers and our fellow authors, Brendan DuBois, Andi Shechter, SJ Rozan and her sister Deborah have found a way of commemorating Jerry’s work and life that I think he would have absolutely loved.

As Brendan says in his announcement: “Besides his work as an attorney and an author, Jerry was a U.S. Army vet, and was also a lover of dogs. We have therefore reached out to a service dog organization in Maryland that trains dogs to assist wounded veterans, and they will be thrilled to receive donations in Jerry's name.”

This all started a few weeks back when Brendan asked me the deceptively simple question, “What cause would Jerry want?”  My first thoughts were things that were on my mind – causes like depression, suicide prevention or literacy. All worthy, but not . . . very Jerry.

So I asked myself Brendan’s question again: “What would Jerry want?” If you knew Jeremiah Healy for any length of time, you might have heard him talk about the military and refer to somebody as “the real thing.” “The Real Things” are men and women who served our country heroically and selflessly, often at the expense of life, limb or mental health. In fact, the only time I saw Jerry cry was as he recounted an air mission in which the pilots took off knowing that, once the mission was achieved, they didn’t have the fuel to return.

As for the canine component, I can’t tell you how many strolls were doubled in duration because Jerry had to stop every passing dog-walker with the question “Is he (or she) friendly?” and give ‘em a good scratch. Even depressed, it was the one thing that seemed to help him, so I can only imagine what it does for wounded vets.

So Hero Dogs, it is! Below is the scoop (no pun intended, though I kind of like it) from Brendan and company. We’d appreciate your sharing the word--Jerry always believed in paying it forward.

With thanks for the happiness you gave Jerry,
Sandy Balzo
http://jeremiahhealy.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Mitch-on-the-Hill1.jpg 
By Brendan DuBois:
I'm so very pleased to announce that through the efforts, suggestions and recommendations of Sandra Balzo,  Andi Malala Shechter, SJ Rozan and her terrific sister, Deborah B. Rosan, that a means of commemorating Jeremiah Healy's works and life has been established. Besides his work as an attorney and an author, Jeremiah Healy was a U.S. Army vet, and was also a lover of dogs. We have therefore reached out to a service dog organization in Maryland that trains dogs to assist wounded veterans, and they will be thrilled to receive donations in Jerry's name.
The group is called Hero Dogs, and is based in Maryland. Their website is listed below. They are an IRS approved 501(c)(3) organization and operate entirely on donations. You can donate via their website, or by sending a check to Hero Dogs, P.O. 64, Brookeville, MD 20833-0064. But please ensure either by writing on the memo section of your check, or using the form on their website, that you're making this donation in Jerry's name. That way, Hero Dogs can track how many donations come in, so that they can be used in some way to keep Jerry's memory alive in years to come. Please donate what you can, and please share this link. Thanks to all of you who were friends or fans of Jerry's. http://www.hero-dogs.org/

Oct 212014
 

Backlist Spotlight: Nice Girl Does Noir
Image

Dear Ed,

"Short stories are the poetry of prose. They are precise, cut to the bone, every word a necessity. Not many authors develop that control. Libby Fischer Hellmann has the hand of a master. Take it from a guy who knows her well: Libby is a nice girl. But she writes noir with a savvy edge honed on the hard, dark knowledge of the evil possible in us all." - William Kent Krueger
While Kent's words are meant to be flattering, I do have to confess something: I love writing short stories. I often say that a novel is like a marriage, but a short story is an affair: passionate, all-consuming, wonderful, and brief. So I've written lots of short stories, and continue to. I've collected fifteen of them in Nice Girl Does Noir. Volume I includes five Ellie Foreman and Georgia Davis stories; Volume II has ten stand-alone stories that span different territories, characters, and times. You'll find them all here.
And if you'd like to know why I think writing short stories are critically important for a writer's career, take a look at this article.
Reviews
"I don't usually like short stories, but these are terrific! I roared through them. Hellmann had a good mix of Chicago historicals and contemporaries. My highest recommendation here."
- Molly Weston, Meritorious Mysteries
"When Hellmann explores the less sunlit areas of Chicago, her canvas becomes not only more universal but has greater depth and emotional value. Aspiring short-story writers would do well to pay attention."
- Naomi Johnson, The Drowning Machine

Best




Libby
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trapped in the netherworld of your spam box.





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Oct 202014
 


Harry Dean Stanton: at 88, still going strong down Route 66

A screening of an acclaimed documentary about the actor offered a rare chance to see him in concert

from The Guardian UK
Harry Dean Stanton in Hollywood, October 2014.
Harry Dean Stanton in Hollywood, October 2014. Photograph: Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images
California is crippled by a three-year “mega-drought”. The rivers are withering, the landscape a scratchy brown, and woe betide those who break the hosepipe ban.

Perfect weather, then, for a gravelly performance from Harry Dean Stanton: a man with a face like dust bowl, dessicated further by 70 odd years of cigarettes.

Stanton has appeared in more than 200 movies including Paris, Texas, Wild At Heart and as cat loving Brett in Alien. I first saw him as the dad in Pretty in Pink. Laconic, beaten-down, accepting, I thought he was the coolest thing since Molly Ringwald’s prom frock.

His backstory was explored Sophie Huber’s brilliant documentary, Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction (released in 2012, now available on Netflix).
This Swiss-born film-maker first meets her subject in his regular drinking haunt, Dan Tanas in Santa Monica, and uses music as her route in to this intensely private man. She follows him as he potters about his day-to-day routine, splicing the footage with pared down renditions of his favourite songs, such as Danny Boy and Blue Bayou, which are performed from the safety of his living room.
Late last month, the film was screened at the Grammy Museum in downtown LA, and both Stanton and Huber took part in a charming Q&A afterwards. Followed by some tunes: Stanton singing and on harmonica, accompanied by guitar and bass.
As he took to the stage, fragile as a larch, the audience moved to the edge of their seats. Stanton fumbled first for his reading glasses, then for one of his many harmonicas, all tuned to different keys. Would he make it through the first bar? He would; albeit from the comfort of an overstuffed armchair (as he said - he is 12 years off 100).
His exit was quicker: Stanton scarpered immediately after the three tracks were over; his guitarist, Jamie, revealed to the crowd that he’d called the night before to try and wriggle out of the performance.
Stanton was one of those rare beasts: exactly in the flesh as you’d suspect from the screen. Introspective, and mischievous; a loner, and old-fashioned with it. In an age of white noise and celebrity hysteria, this was a reminder of a previous time; refreshing courtesy in the drought. He’d never married, he said in the film - and only once proposed because it seemed the civil thing to do. He’s wiser now he’s older, he said. After all, “what’s wrong with silence?”

Headlines that shouldm’t be true but are

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Oct 202014
 




Daily soda consumption not only expands your waistline — it
destroys your DNA

Justice Ginsburg admits to keeping stash of ‘Notorious RBG’ shirts to give to friends

Cage-fighter War Machine blames anti-male society for his domestic violence in suicide note

Bagpipe-playing Oregon racist’s message backfires as community unites against hate

Revealed: King Tut had overbite, club foot because his parents were brother and sister

Pat Robertson rants over ‘deadly’ gay marriage in Idaho: It’s an ‘onslaught of homosexual behavior’

Texas men accidentally shoot each other while firing at partygoers over beer pong loss

SC GOP candidate: Don't be deceived -- 'cute' same-sex 'gremlins' will destroy US

Teen convicted as 'armed clowns' spread panic in French towns

John Oliver ‘dogs’ Supreme Court with hilarious canine re-enactments

Tavis Smiley rips Bill Kristol: You are ‘the worst of America’ for
using Ebola in politics

Pumpkin Festival coordinator gets physical with local reporter trying
to cover riots

Russell Brand’s anti-voting revolution makes Sex Pistols’ ‘Johnny
Rotten’ want to puke

Video shows scuffle between St. Louis Rams fans and Ferguson protesters

Oklahoma man opens fire on ex-girlfriend for not leaving 'fast enough':
police

Kafkaesque ‘bureaucratic clusterf*ck’: Oliver slams US treatment of
military translators

Fox News priest: How can we baptize kids in same-sex families if
parents are sinners?

Tennessee lawmaker arrested again, this time for stalking and
threatening neighbor

Researchers develop tiny tractor beam, and they’re sure they could make
a larger one

Welcome to the best World Series ever — and why ESPN can’t see it

Black Nevada conservative and ‘brave white man’ Cliven Bundy call Eric
Holder out

Supreme Court denies request to block Texas voter ID law

Will there be enough fish to go around? Not if we follow healthy eating
guidelines

Ebola fearmongering is the GOP’s new crazy, racist dog whistle

‘I’m not panicked, I’m just pissed’: Bill Maher blasts Dallas hospital
‘morons’ over Ebola

Two guys show up as famous women for dress as celebs event, and school
freaks out

Willie Horton 2.0: Republicans launch ‘race-baiting’ ad linking
Nebraska Democrat to murderer

Tesla Motors slams Michigan car dealers for new bill banning them from
in-state sales

Question of lynching lingers around hanging death of black NC high
school football player

California man eaten by bear after dying from heart attack







Oct 192014
 















Bogie and Bacall: Dark Passage (1947)
from the criminal element




In tribute to the late Lauren Bacall, we’re looking at the four classic films she made with husband and screen partner Humphrey Bogart between 1944 and 1948: To Have and Have NotThe Big SleepDark Passage, and Key Largo. Last week we looked at Hawks’ The Big Sleep. Today we’ll look at Delmer Daves’ Dark Passage.
Dark Passage doesn’t get any respect. It’s a fine film noir that has two things working against its reputation: 1) a hokey stylistic device, and 2) the fact that it is the least of the Bogart/Bacall vehicles.
I’ll deal with each of these criticisms in a moment. First however, the plot: Bogart plays Vincent Parry, a convict who has just busted out of prison when the film starts. He’s picked up by a talkative motorist named Baker (Clifton Young). It doesn’t take Baker long to figure out that Parry’s a fugitive, so Parry slugs him, takes off on foot and is picked up by another motorist. She’s Irene Jansen (Bacall), and surprisingly she already knows who Parry is and wants to help him. It turns out that Parry was convicted of killing his wife, and Irene followed his trial in the papers, convinced of his innocence. Before long, Parry undergoes a facelift and sets out to track down his wife’s killer.

Because the story involves plastic surgery, the makers had to come up with a way to handle Parry’s transition from one face to another. Their solution was to have the pre-facelift sections of the movie told from Parry’s point of view through a subjective use of the camera (i.e. the camera functions as his eyes, so we never see his face). The subjective camera was a hot concept in 1947.Orson Welles had planned to use it in his proposed adaptation of Heart of Darkness before abandoning the idea as unworkable. Robert Montgomery picked up the idea and shot his entire adaption of Raymond Chandler’sThe Lady in the Lake with a subjective camera. The results there were disastrous. Here, the technique is a bit distracting, but Daves is able to blend it a little more seamlessly into the story. For one thing, although much of the first forty minutes of the film is done subjectively, not all of it is. Daves gives himself the freedom to alternate between Parry’s point of view and a more conventional point of view that includes establishing shots. It also helps that once the facelift occurs we cut to Bogart’s lovely visage. While the subjective camera stuff is gimmicky, it has the virtue (unlike in Montgomery’s film) of serving a purpose and solving a problem presented by the story.
The other obstacle standing in the way of Dark Passage’s reputation is that it has the unfortunate distinction of being lumped together with the other Bogart/Bacall films (To Have and Have Not, The Big Sleep, Key Largo). Those movies are masterpieces (at least the first two are), and I will grant that Dark Passage does not rise to their level.
However, this is quite a fine piece of work. For one thing, Bacall is excellent. She has to carry the first half of the movie by herself because Bogart isn’t onscreen, and she also has to make Irene’s rather odd character believable. She carries off both of these tasks with great skill, and her work here is far more interesting than in Key Largo, where her job mostly consisted of staring at Bogart with longing for two hours. When Bogart does appear onscreen, he’s as good as she is. His Vincent Parry is an underacknowledged swerve for the actor. Parry isn’t a superhero like Sam Spade or Philip Marlowe. He’s a normal guy who’s in over his head.
The first two Bogart and Bacall movies were all about the sexual tension between the leads. They were falling in love onscreen and having an affair offscreen. By the time they made Dark Passage, however, they were married. The sexual tension of the earlier work—which also owed something to the airy touch of director Howard Hawks—is here replaced by gravity. Bacall has a way of looking through Bogart, stripping him of any defensive shield. And Bogart’s mournful visage—especially his dark, heavy eyes—seems weighed down by a deep-seated knowledge of failure. This quality is perfect for Dark Passage, based as it is on an early novel by the great David Goodis, an author incapable of writing about heroes. His characters are sad, lonely, broken people. This movie glosses things up a bit, of course, but the last few scenes between Bogart and Bacall have a fragile emotionalism unlike anything else in their work together. The last shot of the film is probably the sweetest one they ever shared.
The rest of the cast is equally good. In particular, Clifton Young is a sleazy joy as Baker, the slugged motorist who resurfaces later in the movie to make trouble for Bogie and Bacall. And it is always good to see Agnes Moorehead. Here she plays Madge, an old friend of Parry’s and the key to unlocking the mystery at the center of the movie. When she was used right, there was no one more hypnotically watchable than Agnes Moorehead, and here she’s used right.


I’ve always thought Delmer Daves was an underrated director. For one thing, his movies unfailingly have a great physicality. This made him a strong hand at westerns (3:10 to Yuma, The Hanging Tree), but it also served him well in his noir work (The Red House). His films usually have atmospheres achieved through their excellent utilization of black & white photography and even more through a mastery of art design, set decoration and camera work. Daves wasn’t a realist, but he had a realist’s eye. In Dark Passage you can almost smell the cheap apartments, the cigarette smoke, and the alcohol. Some of the film was shot on location in San Francisco, and he exploits that glorious city as well as anyone ever did.
Dark Passage isn’t a masterpiece, but it’s a damn good piece of work and one that I never seem to tire of seeing again.

Jake HinksonThe Night Editor, is the author of The Posthumous Manand Saint Homicide.
Read all posts by Jake Hinkson for Criminal Element.
Oct 182014
 






Gravetapping



Posted: 16 Oct 2014 10:42 AM PDT
The Peninsula is “a comma of land hooking into the sea southeast of Melbourne” in Victoria Australia. It is a tourist destination known for its beaches, wineries, and coastal towns. It is sparsely populated, beautiful, and, recently, the stalking ground for a sex killer. One woman was found dead on the Old Peninsula Highway—a lonely road treading the eastern coast of the peninsula, cutting south and west—and another has disappeared.

Inspector Hal Challis, the regional homicide specialist, is assigned the investigation. The search is headquartered in the fictional city of Waterloo. A city with a small police force, and an even smaller CIB—Criminal Investigation Branch—squad. The killer is careful and clean. The only significant lead is the track of a rare brand of tire near the dumping site of a victim—

“There was no semen. The killer used a condom. There were no fingerprints. The killer used gloves. What he’d left on his victims wereabsences, including the absence of life.”

The Dragon Man is a beautifully written police procedural. The main plot is supplemented with crisscrossing subplots. An overzealous constable. A series of house burglaries. A frightened woman trading sex for drugs. And Hal Challis. An almost broken, flawed man. A man who is married to a woman who, along with her lover, attempted to kill him. A man who is underestimated by most, and a man who is likable, and, at times, real.

“He drove on. Christmas Day. With any luck, someone would find a body and free him from Christmas Day.”

The setting is rendered with care, and the small details—a bucket in the shower to catch the water for additional use in the garden, dry draught-like conditions of mid-summer heat, herons feasting on mosquitoes—create a real world believable place. A place that is familiar, but simultaneously exotic. Mr Disher also plays with morality. The police often behave more consistently with the criminals they chase. One steals evidence from the police locker. Another attempts to blackmail a woman for sex during a traffic stop.

The Dragon Man is the real deal. It is the first novel (of six, so far) featuring Hal Challis. It is something of a cross between literature and police procedural. It is economical, meaningful, and a wonderfully entertaining novel.

Oct 172014
 

Outlaw Ranger #2: Hangman's Knot Now Available for Pre-Order

Hell came to Santa Angelina on a beautiful morning, as the Texas settlement was practically wiped out by vicious outlaws led by the bloodthirsty lunatic Henry Pollard. Now Pollard is in jail in Alpine, waiting on his trial and an all but certain date with the hangman. The only real question is whether an outraged lynch mob will string him up first. 

Not everyone wants to see Pollard dance at the end of a rope, however. His gang of hired killers would like to set him free, and so would his older brother, a wealthy cattleman who has always protected Pollard from the consequences of his savagery. 

Riding into the middle of this three-cornered war is the Outlaw Ranger, G.W. Braddock, who may not have a right anymore to wear the bullet-holed star-in-a-circle badge pinned to his shirt, but whose devotion to the law means he'll risk his life to see that justice is done! 

HANGMAN'S KNOT is another fast-action Western novel from New York Times bestselling author James Reasoner. Brand-new and never before published, it continues the violent saga of the Outlaw Ranger.

Brash Books DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE BOOK

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Oct 172014
 

God Project







DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE BOOK

THE UNFORGETTABLE, UTTERLY ORIGINAL POLITICAL THRILLER

It’s the early 1990’s. The newly elected President learns that the CIA has a dirty secret that they’ve kept hidden from him and the military. The agency has developed a secret weapon called The God Project that would give them the power to conquer a nation…but somehow they’ve lost it. The President assigns Malcolm Keyes, a speechwriter who remembers everything he sees and hears, to uncover the conspiracy and find the weapon before the CIA, or a rival government, does and gets the “God-like” power to control the world.
“Another hilarious romp. The characters are carefully drawn and the action continuous. The book offers comic relief for serious spy thriller fans and fun reading for the rest of us.”
Library Journal
“Funny, sexy, and smart.”
Kirkus Reviews
“A suspenseful, witty, thoughtful adventure.”
Publishers Weekly
Oct 162014
 

Ghost Wanted by Carolyn Hart


















By  September 30, 2014Read More →

Ghost Wanted by Carolyn Hart

By Mary Kennedy for The Big Thrill Magazine
Recently, I sat down with Carolyn Hart to talk about GHOST WANTED, the fifth book in her Bailey Ruth series. Ms. Hart (who also writes the enormously popular Death on Demand series) has come up with an unlikely recipe for success: take one amateur sleuth who happens to be a ghost, add a heavenly supervisor who sends her on a mission to earth, and mix a healthy dose of humor and an engaging plot. Now stir well and enjoy this delicious concoction.
GHOST WANTED is the fifth in the Bailey Ruth series, and the heroine is as irrepressible as ever. I’m intrigued by her relationship with Wiggins, her straight-arrow supervisor at Heaven’s Department of Good Intentions.  Bailey Ruth is known to be something of a loose cannon and I remember she was operating off the grid occasionally in book four, GHOST GONE WILD. I wondered if Wiggins is ever exasperated with her? Or is her feistiness part of her charm?
In GHOST WANTED, Wiggins hopes that Bailey Ruth’s imagination and kindness will rescue the reputation of the library’s resident ghost who has a special place in Wiggins’s heart. We discover the heartbreak of World War I and hope that Bailey Ruth can reunite lovers parted on the battlefield.
You once said that writers enjoy creating recurring characters because “the author knows the terrain and understands the characters’ mores.” I think you were talking about Annie and Max Darling in the Broward’s Rock series, but does it hold true for Bailey Ruth?  Will she ever push the envelope on her missions to earth and defy Wiggins?
Bailey Ruth is always on the edge of catastrophe but so far she has managed through charm to avoid a precipitous return to Heaven when she incurs Wiggins’s displeasure. I am currently writing next year’s Bailey Ruth and she is at the moment fending off The Rescue Express.

Why do so many readers enjoy mysteries?
Mysteries can be very therapeutic. They provide a sense of order in a disorderly world and reaffirm a commitment to justice.
I remember you once told me that you had shown the manuscript of the first book, GHOST IN TROUBLE, to a priest.  I meant to ask a follow-up question.  What prompted you to show him the manuscript?
I used a small Episcopal Church as the background because that is the church we attend. However, I wanted to be sure I hadn’t said something egregiously stupid but Fr. Petley, whom I adore, said, “Carolyn, until Edward R. Murrow returns with a first-hand account, your version of Heaven is as valid as anyone’s.”
You were so kind to the 389th Renegades in the Hart to Heart project. A lot of people may not realize that you sent twenty pounds of coffee, snacks, autographed books and homemade goodies to our brave men and women who were serving at a remote desert outpost in Iraq. You were touched by their stories and reached out to them. They all came back safely and they still remember your generosity. I still receive emails from Lt. Col. Lisa Schieferstein, who commanded the garrison. You were a hero to the troops.
The troops are heroes to me. God Bless them now and always for their courage, their commitment, and their love of country.
You’re too modest to mention that you’ve won the Agatha, Anthony, and Macavity awards. At the beginning of summer, you were awarded the Grand Master Award by the Mystery Writers of America. Previous recipients include Stephen King, Mickey Spillane, Alfred Hitchcock, Ellery Queen, Erle Stanley Gardner and many others.  Heady company indeed! What was it like walking up to the podium to receive the award? I remember there was a video tribute to you.
I still find it hard to believe. I thanked everyone there because they are MWA and they came that night because they know mysteries matter. We live in a world stained by evil but we can always find goodness, honor, and justice—we can read a mystery.
You have an amazing career, and I’m so happy readers are discovering and enjoying your earlier books. It seems like you have your hands full with the Broward’s Rock, Death on Demand series, and now the Ghost series. Is there anything new on the horizon? Your readers are glad to see that your World War Two mysteries are back in print along with CLIFF’S EDGE, a novel set in ancient Rome.
I never know what I will write next. I’m thinking about returning to Nela and Steve, who were introduced in WHAT THE CAT SAW.
We’re fellow cat lovers, and I have to confess that Jugs stole my heart in WHAT THE CAT SAW. I hope Jugs will reappear in the Nela Farley series. What do animals—especially cats—add to your life?
We consider our cats to our friends. They love us. We love them. They are God’s most elegant creatures.

Thanks so much for taking time out to talk with us. I can’t wait for more Bailey Ruth adventures.
*****
Hart Carolyn2011MWA Grand Master Carolyn Hart is the author of 57 novels of mystery and suspense, most recently CLIFF’S EDGE and DEATH AT THE DOOR. Among her suspense titles, all currently available, are ESCAPE FROM PARIS, LETTER FROM HOME, and BRAVE HEARTS. She is a past president of Sisters in Crime and the winner of Agatha, Anthony and Macavity awards.
To learn more about Carolyn, please visit her website.

Headlines that shouldn’t be true but are

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Oct 162014
 



After death threats, feminist speaker has to cancel talk because of
Utah’s concealed carry laws

High school football player still on team while out on bail for two
sets of rape charges

‘Sovereign citizen’ gets 7 years for targeting judges, prosecutors with
bogus $100 billion liens

College in Texas, which has Ebola, rejects applicant from Nigeria,
which does not

Republican Missouri official: I meant ‘no ill will’ calling Obama ‘our
domestic enemy’

SC governor defends Confederate flag at Statehouse: Not ‘a single CEO’
has complained

Texas police officer under investigation for pepper-spraying bystander
filming him

Discount store manager demands mother leave disabled son in hot car
while she shops

Teens charged in disgusting ice bucket challenge prank pulled on
autistic teen

Jon Stewart mocks media and Texas Repub for catching ‘sanity-resistant
strain of fear’



Georgia county threatened to cut off hospital sewer lines over Ebola,
doctor says

Right-wing Jimmy John’s forbids employees from making competitors’
sandwiches for two years

Antigay activist Tony Perkins: Allowing same-sex marriage is like
ignoring gravity

These 5 unhinged Ebola conspiracy theories expose the right’s
anti-Obama delusions

NC pastor comes unglued over coming gay weddings: ‘You think Ebola is
bad now, just wait!’

'Anonabox' router that anonymizes Internet activity easily raises
$300,000 on Kickstarter

Georgia county threatened to cut off hospital sewer lines over Ebola,
doctor says

Physicist Lawrence Krauss: Spiritual experiences are a byproduct of
humanity’s hard-wired narcissism

Only 10 years away? Lockheed Martin claims major fusion power
breakthrough

Pat Robertson: Hollywood is going to force us to watch homosexuals
until Jesus comes back

Conservatives reinvent Christopher Columbus as anti-Muslim crusader to
excuse atrocities

Second Texas nurse with Ebola had traveled by plane a day before she
reported symptoms

WATCH: Texas pastor protesting ‘tyranny at its finest’ arrested at city
council meeting

Tennessee woman gets jail time for overgrown yard